Seed Pods & Flowers

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Blue Wild Flax Flowers – Saturday

We still have smoky haze in the air, presumably from the wildfires to the north and west of us. The diffuse light made for better photographs than I’ve gotten some days.

All of the flower beds are stripped and buried under new dirt, now. In the near future, I will have to clear the vegetable/salad garden where the wild flax now grow. The bunnies are now long gone to other people’s back yards, and among the volunteer plants in the salad garden, I see several poison ivy plants. Not a good thing.

Gardens…

As I had mentioned, we contracted to have various work done at our home; that is now underway. An egress window for the basement, as there is now only one way out and we are not getting younger or more agile, and raised window wells were addressed this past week. On Monday at 8:00 a.m., work begins on removing the sidewalks (except from the front door to the boulevard) and the back step. The piles of dirt will be used to help in filling up the holes left by taking out the sidewalks. There will also be more dirt brought in to encourage rain water to drain away from the house. Most of that, though, will be taken care of by removing the sidewalks that have sunk over the decades to slant toward the house and garage. We also have arranged to replace the double windows in the kitchen and the casements.

Burying the garden spaces around the house by more than half a foot of dirt will pretty much eliminate my flower beds. (And the dog will be tracking in mud until sometime next summer.)

I have dug out the chives from beside the back door and hope to replant them in time to let them take root again. They needed to be thinned in any case. The irises and tulips will, I am afraid, be buried too deeply. We’ll see. The tulips, irises, narcissus/daffodils, and lilies made little to no showing, and none of the four peony bushes survived the winter. I don’t know what happens to the bulbs and rhizomes when they skip a year or two of growth.

Displaced: narcissus, tulips
Displaced: narcissus, tulips
displaced: daffodils, various tulip varieties, lilies, mexican hats, white violets, sunflowers
displaced: daffodils, various tulip varieties, lilies, mexican hats, white violets, sunflowers
Displaced: tulips, blue wild violets
Displaced: tulips, blue wild violets
Displaced: peony bushes and chives
Displaced: peony bushes and chives
Displaced: tulips, double tulips, hollyhocks
Displaced: tulips, double tulips, hollyhocks
Displaced: black and bearded blue irises, peony bushes
Displaced: black and bearded blue irises, peony bushes

As you probably noticed, there were only blue wild flax in the vegetable garden, along with a few thistles on two sides of the house that I did not take down because there was scant else for the bees, wasps and hoverflies to feed on. We didn’t dig up the garden for planting herbs or vegetables, this year, on account of the rabbit who decided to take up residence there to raise bunnies in a safe, familiar setting (once we’d put up ornamental fencing around the garden plot to keep Samantha out). I am not sure how many bunnies were born there, but three survived for sure. Somehow I am going to make sure that I get the garden plot dug out before winter, so I have some control over who resides there, next spring. And I am going to pour pebbles down the rabbit hole.

Samantha, still waiting for rabbits to appear in the garden
Samantha, still waiting for rabbits to reappear in the garden

I am not sure that everything will be under control to my husband’s satisfaction in time for me to order perennials for autumn planting. Also, he wants to be able just to mow over everything and not think about yard work otherwise. I may have to hire someone to come in and do the lawn work and trimming.

One of my part-time jobs, growing up, was assistant groundskeeper for the village cemetery. I enjoyed that very much and would like to be able to do that work here. I suspect that if I get my diet and breathing exercises straightened out, I will have less trouble with the airborne allergens. I am still the one who does the pruning on the shrubs and cuts down the volunteer trees that sprout around the perimeter.

At any rate, I will need to work hard to keep weeds from growing until other cover takes root to compete with them. I’d really like to replace the lawn with a clover variety that will not have to be mowed and make a nice, soft carpet in the back yard. Crowd out the weeds and thistles.